More on POC in TV

Good article over at Gawker relating the show Girls I posted about earlier. My fave bits:

It’s a failing of contemporary American culture that if there’s ever a discussion about adding a black character to a show, people immediately think that means a slang-spitting, wise-cracking stereotype. They assume the person asking for diversity is asking for the show’s creator to change the entire dynamic of the program. Instead, what’s more often happening is that the person interested in diversity is simply asking for the show’s creator to understand that black people can and do do everything white people do, usually making a character’s race irrelevant.

And:

When he won the Pulitzer this year for criticism, the Boston Globe‘s Wesley Morris owed part of his victory to his writing about the Fast and Furious film series. Though the Fast movies are almost universally mocked as obnoxious pieces of shit, Morris calls them “incredibly important” for their depictions of race. “[U]nlike most movies that feature actors of different races, the mixing is neither superficial nor topical,” Morris wrote of Fast Five. “It has been increasingly thorough as the series goes on—and mostly unacknowledged. That this should seem so strange, so rare, merely underscores how far Hollywood has drifted from the rest of culture.”

I’ve also noticed this about the Fast series and glad it got a mentioned here. My Masters thesis was on the depiction of Asian Americans in American film and televisions so this issues is obviously close to me and I’m glad to see if getting some traction by the media…

What if Zimmerman’s victim were white?

Bernard Finel postulates:

The racism is in the form of assumptions and predispositions. When the cops arrived on the scene, they found a dead black kid and an armed community watch volunteer, and the pieces all just seemed to fall into place. Of course, the kid had jumped the innocent citizen who had used self-defense. Now, once that was their mindset, they essentially set about defending it, tidying up loose ends, not asking too many questions, and so on.

But look, isn’t it obvious that had the dead kid been white, there would have been a lot of more questions asked? The cops would have arrived on the scene, and you would have an unarmed dead white kid, an armed hispanic dude with an arrest record. My guess is that their initial mindset would have been quite different.

Of course this is speculation but the statistics back it up but I post this more to demonstrate the subtly of racism that is often overlooked.