Will they never learn..?

Thought Required; Pants Optional.

This morning, I encountered a brief post at ThinkProgress, “Conservative Pundits: Accepting Same-Sex Marriage is Common Sense.” The article relates remarks made by Mary Matalin and George Will on yesterday’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos to the effect that the popular politics surrounding marriage equality in the United States is trending inexorably towards widespread popular support for equality. The state-level victories for marriage equality in the 2012 elections, and public opinion charts like this one, tell the story.

The tenor of the ThinkProgress article is positive: it means to say “look, marriage equality and LGBTQ rights are obviously advancing when even Mary Matalin and George Will admit publicly that marriage equality is coming.”

But I am not so excited. This post inadvertently shows an ugly side to the politics of marriage equality, an ugly side others and I have feared would come. Read carefully what Mary Matalin actually…

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Calling out the racists

Aside

Hello There, Racists!

From the same people who brought you White People Mourning Romney, comes another great tumblr. This one is bold, but it’s about time. It calls out the names and locations (and hilarious pictures) of the folks who spout off the racist shit you’ve been seeing on Twitter and Facebook since the re-election.

I’m a big believer in public shaming and most of these folks are just kids in high school who really don’t know any better, but they’re not going to learn any better from their parents, so let the public shaming begin!

What if Zimmerman’s victim were white?

Bernard Finel postulates:

The racism is in the form of assumptions and predispositions. When the cops arrived on the scene, they found a dead black kid and an armed community watch volunteer, and the pieces all just seemed to fall into place. Of course, the kid had jumped the innocent citizen who had used self-defense. Now, once that was their mindset, they essentially set about defending it, tidying up loose ends, not asking too many questions, and so on.

But look, isn’t it obvious that had the dead kid been white, there would have been a lot of more questions asked? The cops would have arrived on the scene, and you would have an unarmed dead white kid, an armed hispanic dude with an arrest record. My guess is that their initial mindset would have been quite different.

Of course this is speculation but the statistics back it up but I post this more to demonstrate the subtly of racism that is often overlooked.

Wait? Rue is BLACK?!!?

From: Racist Hunger Games Fans Are Very Disappointed.

Racism, alive and well.

More:

All these… people… read the Hunger Games. Clearly, they all fell in love with and cared about Rue. Though what they really fell in love with was an image of Rue that they’d created in their minds. A girl that they knew they could love and adore and mourn at the thought of knowing that she’s been brutally killed.

And then the casting is revealed (or they go see the movie) and they’re shocked to see that Rue is black. Now… this is so much more than, “Oh, she’s bigger than I thought”. The reactions are all based on feelings of disgust.

An Open Letter to White People…

A really awesome essay I just read. Here are my callouts:

Here’s what angers me the most, though: It’s that you can’t see, or refuse to see, that this distinction between intent and impact is the very same distinction to which you appeal when you blame Trayvon for his own murder or when you blame rape victims for their own rapes. You are saying, in effect, Trayvon may not have meant to get shot, but he should have known that wearing his hoodie up like that would make him look threatening to the world. He should have known better. How is that not the same distinction? Why do you get to use this distinction against Trayvon, an innocent child, without anyone getting to use it against you when you try to explain away the actions of the man who killed him? Why? Why does Trayvon or any other person of color have to carry cognitive and volitional burdens you don’t? Why are your comfort and ease and your precious feelings and your ability to mouth off whenever you want about whatever you want so damned important? Why do black kids have to learn to pay for your peace of mind and self-esteem by having to worry about whether what they are wearing might contribute to them getting hunted down in the street? Why is this a privilege you get and he doesn’t? Why can’t you see that this is as blatantly unfair as saying that some spaces are whites only? Why?

In case you’re wondering folks, that is what white privilege is.

Some of you may be thinking, “Brian, you’re not just saying that everyone has to be mindful of what they say and think. You’re saying that as a white person I have to be on my guard in a way people of color don’t. You’re saying I have a heavier burden to carry in this respect than they do.” Actually I doubt many of you would put it so carefully. Usually you– not all of you, not going to name names, you will know who you are–simply cry, “reverse racism!”, then fold your arms and think you’ve made your point. Except you’re simply wrong about this. Notice I didn’t say that we have a difference of opinion about this. You are just wrong. A young black man walking down the street wearing a hoodie is just not inherently threatening, unless, of course, you insist on seeing it that way, and that says more about you than it does the man. Saying and thinking “young black men wearing hooded sweatshirts look threatening,” though, perpetuates the notion that young black men just are threatening. The social facts are simply different on either side in a way that tracks a differential distribution of power. Also, let’s not forget the fact that if we are keeping score on who bears the heavier burdens overall under systemic racism, white folks can bear this burden and still come out way ahead.

Goes for most of my readers too!

We white folks do have a big burden to carry in this one respect, it’s true. We have to be very careful and mindful in discussions of race. But this is not the fault of people of color. At all. What is at fault is the fact that the situations in which we find ourselves are constructed in racist ways that give us privileges we haven’t earned. What white folks should be upset about is the racist legacy left to us by our own forbears. We find ourselves in situations where ignorance is bliss and knowledge is sometimes painful. We have to do hard work, because we can get by just fine by looking the other way; we have to sacrifice time and comfort. After doing so, we might still feel awkward. This work isn’t easy.

via To My Fellow White People: An Open Letter « Thought Required; Pants Optional..

Well said!