7 Things NEVER to Say to Asian-American Executives

Jae Requiro remembers her friend’s story vividly: Following a meeting in which her friend was the only Asian-American woman, a male colleague said to her, “You’re not at all like my Asian wife … you speak up.”

Diversity Inc.

Glenda posted this on her blog and to me, this is a good primer for those of you who think there is such a thing as positive stereotypes. Some of my favorites from this article:

  • “You’re not a minority because all Asians are rich and successful.”
  • “Where are you from? No, where are you really from?” or “When are you going to go home?” or “How often do you go home?”
  • “You aren’t like them” or “You don’t act very Asian.”

Read the whole thing.

Caucasian is a Dirty Word.

I read it on forms. I hear it conversation. And most annoying of all, people refer to me as such. I’m talking about the word Caucasian.

Sure we’re all trying to be PC when we invoke the formal racial title for a group of people we absolutely must designate. African American for blacks, Asian American for Asians, etc. But a history of struggle and racism called for such designators and more importantly, such designators as chosen by the people in question. It only follows that when making racial proclamations where you wish to include white folks, your brain will pause a moment to search for the nice formal self-designated word for whitey. Unfortunately, the word that comes up is Caucasian.

But where did that word come from and how did it rise to the lofty position of designated the white race as a whole? Some might be surprised to know, that like most racial designators, the history of the word Caucasian is racist, inaccurate and flawed. I’m writing this in order to bring light to this dirty word and hopefully work to remove it from our politically correct vocabulary. Continue reading